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Past Grants (1999 - 2005)



IBM Grants for 1999/2000
IBM Grants for 2001
IBM Grants for 2002
IBM Grants for 2003
IBM Grants for 2004
IBM Grants for 2005


IBM Grants for 1999/2000
KIDSMART Early Learning Program
16 Soweto High School Computer Project
ACCORD
Beestepan Agricultural High School
Mabuthela High School
Nonchimudi Primary School
Kimberly College Compu / Wisebus
Tsebo Koloing - "Technology in Motion"
Hippo Water Roller Project
Technology in Education (TECH ED)

 KIDSMART Early Learning Program

IBM in South Africa and the Centre for Early Childhood Development (CECD) launched the KIDSMART Early Learning Program at five pre-schools affiliated to the CECD.

KIDSMART is an innovative childhood learning initiative designed to give pre-kindergarten youngsters a jump-start in education through fun, interactive learning and access to new technology. Originally designed in the US with the assistance of United Way of America, the program centres around IBMs Little Tikes Young Explorer computer stations especially designed for children 3-7 as well as a host of award-winning educational software and learning materials for teachers and care providers.

South Africa is the first country in the world outside of the US to initiate the project. The project was launched on 15 June 2000 at the following Cape-based KIDSMART sites: Maccassar pre-Primary, Nonzame Educare Centre, Lukhanyo and Sunrise Educare Centre, Jireh Childcare Centre and Zama Day Centre in Gauteng.

KIDSMART Early Learning Program

KIDSMART

Mark Harris, with the children from Leratong Early Learning Centre in Soshanguve, near Pretoria, at the IBM KIDSMART Young Explorer Computer learning centre.

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 16 Soweto High School Computer Project

The project affects 16 high schools in Diepkloof and Meadowlands, Soweto, part of one of the most disadvantaged districts in the Department of Education in Gauteng. None of the schools had office computers to handle the huge amounts of information processed by big schools. Bopasenatla, Diepdale, Diepkloof, Fidelitas, Fons Luminis, Kelokitso, Kwa-Mahlobo, Lamula Jubilee, Letsibogo, Madibane, Matseliso, Meadowlands, Mokgome, Namedi, Thutolore and Veritas Secondary Schools received desktop PCs and Lexmark printers for administrative use. Training of 34 teachers and principals, together with the equipment, represents an investment of more than R200,000. The program has now been expanded to assist these schools with a proper administrative and management system.


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 ACCORD

A non-governmental conflict resolution organisation based in Durban, ACCORD was established in 1992 to expedite the process of negotiation and conflict resolution in South Africa. Its focus has since broadened to include the whole of the African continent, with activities stretching from the SADC in the South, to the Great Lakes region, to West Africa and the Horn of Africa in the north-east. When ACCORD was established, Africa lacked a culture of conflict resolution and the initial brief was to promote the peaceful settlement of disputes.

This investment shows the diversity of the IBM South Africa CCR program, gives us exposure to expanding markets and offers a marketing opportunity, with increased coverage in the press and other media. In return ACCORD seeks technical partnership support from IBM.


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 Beestepan Agricultural High School

Beestepan Agricultural High School is situated 30 kilometres from Middelburg in Mpumalanga. The school caters for farm labourers' children, with a vocation-oriented curriculum emphasising agricultural, technical and commercial learning areas.

The school aims to expand and develop in order to give rural children a career-oriented education in line with the SA Schools Act and Curriculum 2005, with special emphasis on computer literacy, science and maths. Furthermore, the school hopes to acquire an administrative program for the processing and recording of data, substantially reducing time-consuming paperwork.

The solution was a technology-based, learner-centred environment (TBLCE), a methodology that underpins the principles of Curriculum 2005's Outcomes-Based Education. TBLCE is a participative approach that helps teachers in corporate technology in an active learning environment. The emphasis is on the role of the teacher as facilitator and the benefits of TBLCE include academic improvement in maths and science, student motivation and enjoyment, and co-operative learning through group activities. In addition, computer literacy objectives are met and word-processing and typing skills are developed. Learners also demonstrate improved management skills.

Ten desktop PCs networked on a server, plus software and training including technical support, were donated in a joint partnership with BP Southern Africa. The project was officially launched on the 28 April 1999. Publicity for this launch was in the form of TV news in the local Mopani news. An article appeared in the Middleburg observer of the same date.


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 Mabuthela High School

Mabuthela High School is situated on the lower South Coast in the district of Umzumbe, in a rural, under-developed community in the KwaNdelu Tribal Authority area. The school was established in 1976 and offers grades 8 to 10. The governing body and teachers decided to introduce subjects such as computer studies, which they regarded as a priority, as well as electricity and electronics, carpentry and motor mechanics.

The objectives of the school include giving the community the hope and skills for a better future, reducing the unemployment rate and promoting job creation and empowering the local youth through skills-building projects.

This project was launched on the 7 September 1999, by our MD at the time, Dennis Hearon. Publicity was on TV news, eTv. Articles appear in the Daily News and Daily Despatch.


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 Nonchimudi Primary School

This primary school is situated in the township of Mahwelereng in the Northern Province. This school employs 12 teachers, has more or less 450 learners in Grades 5,6 and seven. With the help of a US Peace Corps volunteer, a group of teachers formed a Technology Committee. Their aim, to beg or borrow computer equipment to give the pupils of their school a head start by teaching them computer skills. They then approached IBM in Chicago USA. This approach was done by US Peace Corp volunteer, Mr Ron Wietecha, Mayor of the City of Park Ridge. The Chicago IBM office redirected the request to us in South Africa. It was then approved by our Contributions Committee for implementation.

A 22 PC computer laboratory has been donated to Nonchimudi to boost their computer studies. Not only are the children being given computer skills, the new technology centre is being opened to members of the community after school hours. This means both pupils and residents in the area are being equipped with skills that were previously out of reach.

The Technology Centre at Nonchimudi was launched on the 22 September 1999.


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 Kimberly College Compu / Wisebus

For many school children, a bus is simply a means of getting to school and back. But for the five previously disadvantaged schools in Kimberly this is actually the second Wisebus project where IBM has been a contributor. The other Wisebus was launched in 1997 in Atteridgeville, west of Pretoria in partnership with the Atteridgeville Technical College. This serves the area surrounding Pretoria.

The Wisebus is taking the world of computers and the information superhighway to the doors of more than 1 000 pupils in the Galeshewe area of Kimberley. The bus will go a long way towards filling the computer education gap of schools who do not have the means to provide IT training for their pupils. Also known as the mobile education centre, the bus is fully equipped with networked PCs featuring interactive CD-Rom technology and the ability to run powerful software applications to train children from previously disadvantaged schools.

The Wisebus is staffed by a lecturer from the Kimberley College moving from one school to another, spending one day in each of the five schools. More schools will be included in the future scheduling of this bus.

The Kimberley Wisebus project was launched on the 27 August 1999, by the MEC for Education in the Northern Cape, Ms J-Petterssen and IBM’s MD at the time, Dennis Hearon.


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 Tsebo Koloing- "Technology in Motion"

Tsebo Koloing - "Technology in Motion" is a joint venture of the University of Pretoria, Technikon Pretoria and Technikon Northern Gauteng.

The aim of the project is to actively promote an awareness of technology, engineering and natural sciences in communities and among high school learners, in particular to facilitate an increase in the number of learners preparing themselves for a career in engineering and science. The project is two-pronged. A mobile “Technology in Motion” unit consisting of fascinating hands-on experiments and demonstrations is being developed to reach high school learners and communities during visits to schools and local community centres. Another target group is teachers, who will participate in a series of lectures and workshops where they will be provided with the necessary knowledge to guide their pupils to an engineering and science careers.

IBM’s involvement was requested in a form of four upmarket Pentium II MMX 400Hz. This was later changed to ThinkPads but our budget could only afford three IBM ThinkPads as a donation to the project.


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 Hippo Water Roller Project

For the past two years, CCR has contributed to the Hippo Water Roller Trust in the form of 100 water rollers per annum. This are donated to people in rural communities. IBM has pledged to maintain this arrangement for a period of three years, so that we can safely say that we have made life a little better for 300 families affecting maybe 1500 to 2000 people.

The Hippo roller, a unique, award-winning South African design, provides a convenient, efficient and hygienic method of transporting up to 90 litres of water for domestic consumption from the source to home. Last year, IBM together with other donors handed over about 250 of these rollers to the Kgautswane community in the Northern Province.


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 Technology in Education (TECH ED)

Tech-Ed is a project of the Gauteng Department of Education's Constructive Partnership division. The project has succeeded in building partnerships between the Gauteng Department of Education and partners ABSA, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, ITA, Iscor, Rand Merchant Bank and Safren. PCs, dating right back to the XT, are refurbished and put to good use in schools. IBM has donated close to 200 machines destined for scrap, and these have already made a difference in eighteen schools, enhancing school management and administration, computer literacy skills and computer-aided learning.

The IBM external bursary scheme aims to assist and encourage academically competent young undergraduates who might otherwise be unable to afford it, to equip themselves with tertiary education so that they can meet the challenges of business in our changing society. This is a full-cost bursary for the entire study period, giving the students financial peace of mind and enabling them to concentrate on their studies.

The scheme is intended primarily for students from previously-disadvantaged communities, black, coloured and Indian. Students must be registered for an information technology-related course at a South African Technikon or University.

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IBM Grants for 2001
IBM on a roll with donation of Hippo Water Rollers
Life line
South African Music Education Trust
Ekupholeni Mental Health Centre
Johannesburg Institute of Social Services
Foundation for Economic & Business Development
Deaf Education Project at the University of the Witwatersand
Woodside Sanctuary
Other Projects

IBM on a roll with donation of Hippo Water Rollers
 Donation of 800 water-carrying rollers to rural communities

IBM SA, on Friday the 9 November 2001, rolled out another contribution to the upliftment of rural communities, being part of a donation of 800 Hippo Water Rollers to two Mpumalanga villages.

Friday's donation will benefit the communities of Luphisi and Mpakeni adjacent to the community-owned Mthethomusha Game Reserve in Mpumalanga. There are about 800 households in the two communities whose primary source of water is from a river and mountain streams in the area.

IBM, as part of its corporate social responsibility programme, is donating 100 water rollers with the remaining 700 being donated by an anonymous donor from New York, says Alf Mandewo, IBM SA's corporate social responsibility executive. This is the second consecutive year that the donor has teamed up with IBM to donate water rollers to needy communities.

The Hippo Water Roller's design is based on the old-fashioned lawn roller. It can carry up to 90 litres of water and weighs the equivalent of about 12kg when full. The person fetching the water no longer has to carry heavy loads of water, instead rolling the daily supply of water home where the drum can be used as a central water supply and storage tank.

About 12 million South Africans have to walk more than 200 metres, and often up to several kilometers, to reach water for drinking, bathing and cooking. Most of the water bearers are women and children who use containers holding between 5 and 10 litres, carrying them on their heads, in hand or with the relative luxury of a wheelbarrow.

The donation of the Hippo Water Rollers was facilitated by the Africa Foundation, an independent NGO which has worked in Luphisi village for the past two years in partnership with CC Africa's Bongani Mountain Lodge to raise funds from local and international tourists for development projects in the surrounding villages.

"This is the fourth time that IBM has contributed to the Hippo Water Roller Project," says Mandewo. "Previous recipient communities are Laersdrift in Mpumalanga in 1998, Kgautswane, near Ohrigstad in Northern Province in 1999, and Luphisi last year. We are proud to be able to continue our association."

"Many small organisations and projects are overlooked by corporate social responsibility programmes because there is a need to do the greatest good for the greatest number of people. Yet, these small organisations are often the ones closest to the community and have the best understanding of its needs. These organisations thus have the greatest potential to bring about positive change, quickly," Mandewo emphasises.

"The Hippo Water Roller Project alleviates the critical need of thousands of fellow South Africans to be able to fetch and store water in a humane and efficient manner. These water rollers are not the ultimate answer, but until every South African has access to piped water in their homes, IBM will continue to strive to improve conditions and contribute to the upliftment of our communities," he concludes.

IBM on a roll with donation of Hippo Water Rollers

Alfred Mandewo, IBM and Samantha Terblanche, Africa Foundation demonstrate to representatives how the water rollers work


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 Life Line

Life Line West Rand is a non-profit organisation ,affiliated to Life Line International. It boasts some 30 years of counselling experience, and has thus become a professional service to people in crisis.

This service is provided twenty-four hours to all members of the community, by multi-skilled counsellors who are qualified and dedicated to dispensing of emotional support both telephonically and in person. As a community based volunteer organisation, their endeavour is to involve the community and its resource to achieve its objectives.

In order to address and manage the various dilemmas faced by youth, Life Line West-Rand embarked on a program called "Youth to Youth Community Outreach Project." The project is aimed at developing and uplifting the communities on the West Rand with the assistance of thirty trained and highly motivated outreach team members. To be able to reach every community on the whole of the West Rand area, Life Line thought of establishing special mobile teams to reach out to every church, school and generally wherever youths could be found gathering together.

To reach this goal, Life Line made an appeal to IBM, outlining some of their dire needs. IBM responded to this plea by donating three computers and three Lexmark printers, with a total value of R 33 000.

Life Line

A Mandewo shaking hands with Ms Magriet Visser, Co-ordinator Youth Line - Life Line West Rand. Around are members of the West Rand Youth to Youth Community Outreach Teams.


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 South African Music Education Trust

The South African Music Education Trust (SAMET) - a non-profit organisation - was founded in 1994 by a group of trustees representing diverse sectors of the world, in conjunction with commerce and education. SAME focuses on bringing music education to communities in disadvantaged areas throughout South Africa., its main objective being to train and develop musicians from disadvantaged communities. Teacher upgrading, performance enhancement and job creation in the music industry are some of the key issues being addressed.

SAMET made a humble plea to IBM to assist in donating computer equipment that could possibly replace their outdated ones: IBM donated two computers and two printers.


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 Ekupholeni Mental Health Centre

Ekupholeni, translated means "Place of healing", which is exactly what this community-based health institution has come to stand for in the areas of Katlehong, Thokoza, Vosloorus and the surrounding informal settlements. It strives to reach individuals, families, groups and communities that have become victims of poor mental health through factors of political, domestic and criminal violence, unemployment, and severe poverty to mention just a few. It endeavours to engage these in a holistic process of healing, recovery and empowerment. The team consists of eight Community Care Workers, one clinical psychologist, two mental health workers both holding masters degrees in community psychology and two social workers.This health care centre provides mental health services on three levels (1) Individual Face-to -face counselling (2) Group counselling (3) Community mental health development projects.

IBM saw fit to donate R 10 000 to this institution.


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 Johannesburg Institute of Social Services

The Johannesburg Institute of Social Services is a Child and Family Welfare organisation, established in 1934. They render a wide range of services that are geared towards protecting, conserving, promoting and encouraging the development, interests and general welfare of individuals, families and communities. One of the projects undertaken by this organisation is a computer training programme. However with just one computer to be used for training purposes and for compiling reports by the social workers, progress is stunted, and tutoring has become increasingly difficult.

The Johannesburg Institute of Social Services made an earnest appeal to IBM, to consider sponsoring computers to their centre. IBM was more than happy to donate two new workstations and two printers, with a total value of R 22 000.


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 Foundation for Economic & Business Development

The Foundation for Economic & Business Development (FEBDEV) recently undertook what they called the Enterprise Development project at technical colleges and technikons. The success of this prompted the proposal of a similar project at schools, named as The Hands-On Enterprise Development Project. Entrepreneurial activities such as tourism, farming activities, marketing experiences and community activities will all be incorporated into the school curriculum, with educators being empowered and properly trained to implement these entrepreneurial opportunities. These teachers will be trained and provided with the resources necessary for developing opportunities and acting as role models for learners by being enterprising, problem-solving change-agents.

In response to their request for assistance IBM has pledged a sum of R 56 000 which would go toward the funding of a Gauteng school for an entire year.

Foundation for Economic & Business Development

Left to right:
A Mandewo - Corp Community Relations Manger, Noma James - Executive Director - The Foundation for Economic & Business Development and Mr G. Hadebe - Principal - Aha Thuto Secondary School.


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 Deaf Education Project at the University of the Witwatersand

A thoroughly researched assessment of deaf education in South Africa revealed that certain shortcomings in the field of deafness were producing a less than ideal education for the deaf community of South Africa: Despite the various successful structures within South Africa that catered to the needs of the deaf, there was no department that focused solely on the education of teachers of the deaf. Further there was no established training of teachers of the deaf that included the very necessary aspects of Sign Language, Deaf Culture, and the cognitive development of the Deaf learner. It was these factors that prompted the University of the Witwatersrand to undertake the mammoth task of establishing a specific programme in Deaf education at its university.

The work in deaf education at the university has a three fold focus: (1) Teaching : Deaf education has developed three post graduate course options for teachers of the deaf. (2) Research : Developing a base of expertise within the South African Deaf Community by endeavouring to train and involve deaf researchers and research assistants wherever possible. (3) Community service and Outreach : Workshops and seminars for teachers of the deaf, tailored to meet their unique needs on site are held.

IBM made a generous donation of R 10 000, to be used for the furtherance of this very worthy endeavour.


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 Woodside Sanctuary

Woodside Sanctuary provides a haven for abused and handicapped children. It provides round-the-clock residential care for children with severe mental and physical handicaps. Children from all South Africa are accepted, from birth, onwards, regardless of race. Founded in 1955 by a couple who couldn't bear to place their handicapped baby in an institution, the sanctuary today houses 117 permanent residents in six wards, with many more awaiting admission.

Woodside Sanctuary is situated in Auckland Park. In the main, it is a self supporting organisation but has recently begin depending heavily on support from the public. Funds are also raised by sending out mail appeals thrice a year to donors, companies and trusts. Also the sale of Christmas cards and stationery as well as hosting of various functions forms another source of income.

To assist Woodside Sanctuary effectively continue in their praiseworthy efforts, IBM generously donated two computers and two printers to this establishment.


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 Other Projects

Various other schools benefited from generous contributions of IBM computer equipment and training for administrative purposes. Requests for donations are received daily and each of the following schools have benefited:

The Key School for Children with Autism
St Angar's College
Tshilidzi Primary School
Shalom Manne Primary School

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IBM Grants for 2002
Nexus Primary School
Khululeka Community Education Centre
Edenvale Care Centre
Umbiya High School
Humana People to People
Siyakhula Trust
St. Luke's Hospice
University of Witwatersrand
Communal Information Technology Centre (CITC)
African Self Help Association (ASHA)
The Hippo Water Roller Project
Vista Nova
Cape Technikon
Hospice Association of the Witwatersrand
The Heart Foundation
Lusito - Portuguese Association for the Mentally Handicapped

 Nexus Primary School

IBM SA donated computer hardware and software worth R230 000 to the Nexus Primary School in Harrismith in the Free State - creating the first media centre in a primary school in the area and bridging the digital divide for more than 900 underprivileged children.

The donation forms part of IBM's global multi-million dollar e-learning initiative known as 'Reinventing Education'. Based on IBM's experience in thousands of technology-based learning implementations worldwide, Reinventing Education addresses the fact that technology fundamentally changes the way students learn as well as the way they are taught.

Nexus Primary started out nine years ago in a collection of shacks, but Nexus principal, Fikile Mohaladi worked with parents, the then Transitional Local Council, SANCO, consultants and Eskom to persuade the Free State School Building Fund to provide a new school building with appropriate facilities.

All the organisations also provided support in cash or kind for different elements of the project. The new buildings were erected three years ago and already, with the help of the community, the school grounds boast well-cared for gardens and playing fields.

The Nexus media centre is the first of a number of IBM SA initiatives planned in the Free State.


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 Khululeka Community Education Centre

On Wednesday 21 Aug, IBM South Africa donated five desktop computers to help with the administration of the Khululeka Community Education Development Centre in Queenstown and enhance its Internet access.

The Centre has been providing training, resources and support for early childhood development (ECD) practitioners in the northern region of the Eastern Cape for the past 13 years.

All Khululeka programmes are community based and provided in-service.

For practitioners to achieve full and recognised qualifications, they must attain certain levels of literacy and numeracy.

So, the Centre is setting up a computer laboratory in which Internet based adult literacy and numeracy programmes will be made available to practitioners.

"Because computers provide an interactive learning process, we're confident of a higher pass rate than could be achieved by conventional teaching," says Rene King, Khululeka Project Director.

"Also, learners can move through the lessons at their own pace. So slow learners don't hold up fast learners, as so often happens in a classroom."

Says IBM SA's corporate social responsibility executive, Alfred Mandewo: "Helping Khululeka with equipment meets IBM South Africa's social responsibility criteria on many levels."

"For 80 years now, IBM has seen education as the basis of sustainable progress for all communities, no matter where in the world they are."

"And technology delivers education in a memorable and sustainable way. So we make it our business to make technology available to assist with education in whatever form the community needs it."

"At the same time, Khululeka focuses on early childhood development - the heart of any community's ability to learn for life, and therefore adapt and prosper."

"Early childhood development is of particular interest to IBM."

"Which is why we have a large programme, called KidSmart, for donating computers on a nationwide basis to underprivileged preschools."

"In Khululeka's case, the computers we're donating are not for the children,but for the people who will help develop the children."

"And then, we have a particular interest in assisting development in rural areas. Which is why we are glad to be able to support, with technology, early childhood development practitioners working in the rural areas."

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 Edenvale Care Centre

IBM South Africa donated computers and printers to help with the administration of the Edenvale Care Centre, established last year to provide care for terminally ill HIV/Aids sufferers as well as community education about the disease.

The Centre, initially an Edenvale Methodist Church project but now a formally registered Section 21 non-profit organisation, is situated at the corner of 6th Avenue and 4th Street in Edenvale.

Its central situation provides easy access for residents in the greater Edenvale, Tembisa, Modderfontein and Alexandra region.

The building has been renovated to accommodate an eight-bed ward for terminally ill patients. It also has extensive counseling facilities and a small administrative office. During the past two years, counselors have been trained to assist those who come to the Centre and also provide outreach services to homes, clinics, hospitals and places of work. They educate members of the community on all aspects of the pandemic as well as showing them how to care for ill members of their families at home.


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 Umbiya High School

IBM South Africa donated three desktop computers and three printers to the disadvantaged Umbiya High School in the KwaMthethwa Reserve.

The equipment will form the basis of a computer centre that will provide learners with access to information and, thereby, the means of improving their academic achievements.

Says IBM SA's Corporate Social Responsibility Executive, Alfred Mandewo: "These days, education must include computer literacy to give graduates the best possible chance of employment."

"So, while our equipment will give learners access - via the Internet - to a vast electronic library, it will also familiarise them with technology they will encounter in the workplace."

With renewed commitment from teachers, learners and parents, the school last year dramatically improved its matric pass rate from 11 percent to 86 percent - receiving awards from its district and regional offices.

"It is our desire and vision to develop into a school that produces quality students for the new millennium," says principal, S K Singh.

"We believe we can continue to improve our matric rate with computers. Apart from providing unlimited academic resources for both teachers and learners, the Internet will enable them to network with teachers and learners all over the world, broadening their horizons."

"The school will be able to build partnerships, over the Internet, with other academic organisations - thereby breaking down our isolation out here in a rural environment."

"And, we can use the computers to build capacity amongst parents."

Mandewo says that IBM has an 80-year history of supporting education through technology.

"We see education as the basis of sustainable progress for all communities, no matter where in the world they are."

"And technology delivers education in a memorable and sustainable way. So we make it our business to make technology available to assist with education in whatever form the community needs it.

"We also place particular emphasis on supporting rural communities, where the need is often greater than in the cities because there are so few facilities."

"And, it is always a pleasure to be able to help an organisation like the Umbiya High School, where those involved are so very determined to make a difference."

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 Humana People to People

Humana is a non-profit organisation that collects old clothes, shoes, toys and blankets for resale – the funds of which are then used for upliftment of rural communities and support of a kinder-garden school in the Diepkloof area.

IBM South Africa's donation of R4 000 went towards the construction and maintenance of a clothes collection bin that would be placed at IBM headquarters in Sandton, Gauteng. IBM employees would drop off their donations of old clothes etc. into the bin and Humana would arrange for periodic pick-up of these.


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 Siyakhula Trust

Siyakhula Trust approached IBM with a request for donations towards the Siphumele Sewing Project in Orange Farm. This project was awarded a contract by a local school to produce its uniforms. In order to fulfil this contract and to expand the project, the Siyakhula Trust undertook to source funds on behalf of the Siphumele Sewing project.


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 St. Luke's Hospice

IBM South Africa recently donated R10 000 to St. Luke's Hospice.

The money was used towards opening a ward for AIDS patients at the Conradie Hospital in Cape Town. The establishment of this ward enables for specialised medical and nursing care to be administered to AIDS victims.


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 University of Witwatersrand

For many years IBM South Africa awarded prizes to students at the University of Witwatersrand for the best major project in Computational and Applied Mathematics III and Computational and Applied Mathematics Honours. Since the cash lump sum donated by IBM was exhausted, the university again approached IBM for a possible donation of cash prizes.

IBM South Africa donated R 9 000 towards prizes for student achievements in 2001 and 2002 in the categories mentioned above.


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 Communal Information Technology Centre (CITC)

The people of the West Rand town of Carletonville now have the opportunity to learn valuable IT skills thanks to the establishment of a Communal Information Technology Centre (CITC).

The CITC concept, the result of a government-private sector partnership, is aimed at providing skills development and income-generating opportunities for the unemployed. Students receive training in IT applications such as word processing, spreadsheets, databases and e-mail, or in technical support of PC systems and software programs. The first such centre was started in Welkom in 1997. The IT training it has provided has enabled 630 unemployed people (65% of them women) to find work. An additional 20 graduates have been empowered to set up their own businesses.

Many people retrenched from downsizing mines in the area have learnt new skills and found new jobs. In addition, 120 grade 12 scholars participated in a 20-week IT competence course. Of these, 12 went on to study IT at tertiary institutions and 15 gained IT-related employment.

Mining house Anglogold sponsored the building of the centre in Khutsong, while IBM provided 30 computers. 3Com supplied the network facilities while Microsoft provided the software. IT consulting company, PARAG UK, and the Foundation for Future Leaders will provide business training, management guidance and mentoring skills.

In order to make all CITCs self-funding in the long-term, they are geared - through certificated graduates - to provide professional IT services and support to organisations in the surrounding community.

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 African Self Help Association (ASHA)

At Sehlaba Sabana Pre-School in Pimville, Soweto, IBM South Africa handed over to the African Self Help Association (ASHA) another 10 of its KidSmart computers, designed specially to give pre-school children early exposure to technology and help them develop literacy, numeracy and life skills. This donation adds to the 12 KidSmart facilities installed in ASHA-run pre-schools last year as part of a country-wide roll-out of the programme.

The computers form part of IBM's global multi-million dollar early learning programme, implemented in 500 pre-schools worldwide and over 70 pre-schools in South Africa.

KidSmart consists of colorful, child-sized plastic furniture that's durable and easy to clean and incorporates a powerful IBM computer - with 300 Mhz and 3.2 GB hard drive, 14-inch color monitor, speakers and a membrane keyboard. The computer is pre-loaded with award-winning software designed by education specialists to develop creativity and problem-solving skills and engage young children in the learning process with maximum fun.

The programme includes training for teachers to familiarise them with computers where necessary and enable them to integrate KidSmart into their own syllabus, maximising the benefit the children get from the syllabus.

ASHA, founded in 1942, runs 40 pre-schools in greater Soweto, providing daily care, food, safety and all-round development for up to 3 700 children from extremely poor homes. Funded by donors, ASHA is community based - being run by parents, principals and other representatives of the Association's 232 staff, including cooks, housekeepers and handymen.

All ASHA schools serve a second purpose as community facilities, so ASHA's KidSmart facilities also provide parents and other members with a rare local resource.

In rolling out its KidSmart early learning programme, IBM SA works closely with the Centre for Early Childhood Development (CECD) - a national non-government organisation focused on improving education for children between the ages of 0 to nine. The CECD identifies suitable sites for implementation of the programme and monitors them to ensure that the full benefits of the programme are entrenched at each school.


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 The Hippo Water Roller Project

IBM SA again donated R39 900 this year towards the purchase of 100 'Hippo Water Rollers.' This is the third year in succession that IBM has contributed towards easing the burden of residents living in rural communities adjacent to conservation areas.

The revolutionary design of the Hippo Water Roller makes the task of fetching water from taps and streams to their homes easier. The drum has a 90 litre capacity, as opposed to the usual 5 litre containers that are carried on the heads of women and children. Girls as young as four learn to carry these 5 litre drums on their heads. Instead of being trapped into this routine, the Hippo Water Roller frees women and children from this onerous task. When pushed, the weight of the roller is approximately 12kg, which enables children to roll the container home with relative ease. Winner of the 1997 'Design for Development' Award in South Africa, the Hippo Water Roller is bringing relief to countless residents of rural areas who have limited access to water. Water shortage is a dire problem in rural areas, and many people (especially women and children) have to walk distances of 15km daily to collect water from the nearest faucet.

Due to the generosity of an anonymous donor and IBM over the past two years, the Africa Foundation - an independent, non-profit organization - has facilitated the donation of 933 Hippo Water Rollers to be handed over to the Welverdiend community in Limpopo Province on Friday 18 October 2002. has spent over USD128,000 on Water Relief projects (in the form of Hippo Water Roller distribution) in the Mpumalanga and Limpopo Provinces.


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 Vista Nova

At Vista Nova, a school for children with special needs, in Rondebosch, Cape Town, IBM SA officially handed over five of its KidSmart computers, designed to expose children between the ages of three and seven to technology and help them develop literacy, numeracy and life skills.

The computers form part of IBM's global multi-million dollar early learning programme, implemented in 500 pre-schools worldwide and over 70 pre-schools in South Africa.

KidSmart consists of colorful, child-sized plastic furniture that's durable and easy to clean and incorporates a powerful IBM computer. The computer is pre-loaded with award-winning software designed by education specialists to develop creativity and problem-solving skills and engage young children in the learning process with maximum fun.

The programme includes training for teachers to familiarise them with computers where necessary and enable them to integrate KidSmart into their own syllabus, maximising the benefit the children get from the syllabus.

The computers were installed at Vista Nova a few weeks ago and the impact on the children has been immediate.

According to Vista Nova's Development Manager, Jessica Setterberg, "the KidSmart computer has a physical presence like no other. For one thing, it's right there in the classroom. And, it's bright and cheery, talks in a language that children can relate to and plays music. So it's a focus of attention and desire.

"So, it has immediately given our teachers a positive means to teach life skills. For instance, because learners are being allowed to choose who will use the machine next, children with obsessive personalities are learning to cope with a degree of randomness and also to share the machine. And, giving the children choices of that sort teaches them responsibility.

"Academically, the KidSmart software is so user-friendly and positive - praising the children if they get something right or suggesting gently that they 'try again' if not - that the children are not nervous of testing their knowledge. So, KidSmart is providing an extremely rich learning experience for them."

IBM SA's corporate social responsibility manager, Alfred Mandewo, says that although IBM SA usually gives only one KidSmart computer to a school, five have been given to Vista Nova to assess their effect on the children's learning abilities.

"With KidSmart, children have so much fun they don't even realise they are learning - which boosts their confidence in more formal learning situations. We're as keen as the teachers in the senior school to see how much KidSmart can shorten the learning curves for children with special needs."

Founded in 1954, Vista Nova School accepts learners from all sectors of the Western Cape community who have cerebral palsy or learning and other disabilities that preclude them from attending mainstream schools. It subsidises children from disadvantaged, impoverished homes - currently 18% of the 400 learners.

The school offers the standard public school syllabus, from nursery school to Grade 12, and has consistently achieved a 100% Senior Certificate pass rate.

The IBM KidSmart early learning programme is one part of an umbrella IBM e-learning initiative known as 'Reinventing Education'. It includes modules such as TriScience and TriMaths, aimed at triggering rapid interest at an early age in the sciences, and the Hermitage and Pieta programmes, which provide visitors to museums and art galleries with access to some of the world's greatest art treasures.


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 Cape Technikon

The technikon approached IBM with plans to establish a Learning Centre on its premises: a safe and studious environment where students could receive assistance in academic writing, access the internet for research, utilise a 18-hour library service and audiovisual center. In support of this plan, IBM donated four computers.


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 Hospice Association of the Witwatersrand

The work of the Hospice Association of the Witwatersrand focuses on offering active care to the terminally ill, while providing physical and emotional care and comforts when medical treatment is no longer an option. All services offered by this Hospice are available to anyone who needs them, regardless of nature of illness or social circumstance. IBM donated a laptop to Hospice - from which a promotional video would be run to raise funds for the organisation.


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 The Heart Foundation

The Heart Foundation is a NGO that relies on voluntary contributions from communities, corporations and individuals. It runs a Children's Programme that aims to assist children in underdeveloped communities. The computer equipment that the Heart Foundation was using was very old, and it was both costly and impractical to upgrade. IBM donated one PC towards use in the Children's programme.


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 Lusito - Portuguese Association for the Mentally Handicapped

Lusito is a non-profit organisation that caters for some 60 physically and mentally handicapped children from the community. All pupils - irrespective of race or religion - enjoy professional attention. Those coming from very poor backgrounds receive free tuition, and are attired and groomed at the expense of Lusito. Lusito relies on voluntary work and contributions for its continued existence and growth.

IBM donated three computers to aid in Lusito's daily teaching program.


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IBM Grants for 2003
Alf Khumalo Museum
Hippo Water Roller Project
Kingsway School and Centre Concern
MuseuMAfricA
National Children's Rights Committee
SEASA
Siyathuthuka Nursery School Project
Vaalwater Laerskool
Variety Club
Westbury High School

 Alf Khumalo Museum

As Alfred Mandewo IBM SA's corporate community relations manager, drove to work on the morning of Monday 13 October 2003, he tuned into Radio 702 just in time to overhear a very interesting request. Alf Khumalo, a famous South African photographer was making an on-air appeal to all IT companies for a donation of a desktop computer.

Khumalo is respected as one of South Africa's top photographers. His work has featured in many of the top selling newspapers, and magazines like Drum, for instance. His plan was to create a photographic institute in Soweto to motivate young aspiring and upcoming photographers.

Mandewo responded to this appeal, secured the approvals necessary for corporate donations, and on the 23 October 2003, the Alf Khumalo Museum in Diepkloof Soweto became the proud new owner of an IBM computer.


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 Hippo Water Roller Project

The handover of 450 Hippo Water Rollers on 21 November 2003 in the community of Welverdiend, Limpopo Province, South Africa, will ensure that every remaining household receives an ingeniously designed Hippo Water Roller.

IBM SA again donated R42 800 this year towards the purchase of 100 'Hippo Water Rollers.' This is the fourth year in succession that IBM has contributed towards easing the burden of residents living in rural communities adjacent to conservation areas.

The Hippo Water Roller, designed to carry 90 litres of water and rolled along the ground like an old-fashioned lawnmower, aims to make the job of collecting water and transporting it to homes easier and less time consuming. The drum has a 90 litre capacity, as opposed to the usual 5 litre containers that are carried on the heads of women and children. Girls as young as four learn to carry these 5 litre drums on their heads. Instead of being trapped into this routine, the Hippo Water Roller frees women and children from this onerous task. When pushed, the weight of the roller is approximately 12kg, which enables children to roll the container home with relative ease. Winner of the 1997 'Design for Development' Award in South Africa, the Hippo Water Roller is bringing relief to countless residents of rural areas who have limited access to water. Water shortage is a dire problem in rural areas, and many people (especially women and children) have to walk distances of 15km daily to collect water from the nearest faucet.


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 Kingsway School and Centre Concern

Not only does IBM donate its products and equipment but it also endorses financial support to charities that wish to improve their community's education facilities. In June 2003, IBM contributed R11 650 to Kingsway School and Centre of Concern, to assist the center in purchasing KNET (Knowledge Network) computer software. KNET offers a wide range of skills development programmes.

Initiated in the mid 1980's, Kingsway Centre of Concern was set up to meet the welfare, educational and spiritual needs of street children in the Randpark and Honeydew areas. It has since developed into a primary school, which has operated from the Honeyridge Baptist Church premises in Randpark Ridge. The centre caters for approximately 230 learners, most of whom come from the Zandspruit Informal Settlement.


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 MuseuMAfricA

On Tuesday 23 September 2003, IBM SA donated to MuseuMAfricA, Johannesburg's principle history and cultural history museum, an Internet-based kiosk that provides free public access to a digital library of the world's biggest art collection - housed in Russia's Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg.

The donation is part of a US$ 2 million investment by IBM in special technology that allows quick transmission of high-resolution images across the Internet. Previous electronic versions of art works were too memory-intensive.

To date, IBM has digitised more than 3 000 of the Hermitage Museum's three million works of art. They include Old Master paintings (the largest collection in the world), Impressionist and Post-Impressionist work, Classical antiquities, European and Russian applied arts, Oriental art and archaeological items.

IBM has donated Hermitage kiosks to all 170 countries in which it operates. The MuseuMAfrica kiosk is one of three in South Africa. IBM installed one at the South African National Gallery in Cape Town last year and is donating one this month to the Johannesburg Art Gallery in Joubert Park.

Hermitage kiosks include a zoom facility, giving viewers the ability to examine works of art from different angles and in much closer and sharper detail than they could in the museum itself.

Also, IBM's unique scanning technology uses filters that record the colour of a piece of art in the same way as the human eye. This guarantees colour accuracy an order of magnitude better than the best conventional photography.


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 National Children's Rights Committee

IBM recently made a donation of a ThinkPad and three desktops to the National Children's Rights Committee (NCRC).

In 2002, the NCRC - in partnership with the Department of Health and Welfare, and the Health and Welfare Consortium in Limpopo, embarked on project that aimed to reintegrate children in child-headed households into their extended family systems throughout the six districts of Limpopo. A local project implementation team has already been set up in Bushbuckridge to reintegrate children in the district of Bohlabela into their extended families. Computer equipment was needed by the project teams in each of the six communities to facilitate planning consultations around the project, communication between the organisations throughout the country and government officials and for information storage and performance monitoring.

IBM supported this initiative because it provides another opportunity for ensuring that orphaned and vulnerable children are given access to the social security systems in South Africa.


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 SEASA

In support and promotion of IBM's TryScience Programme, two NetVista computers and two colour monitors to the value of R17 828 were donated to SEASA (Science and Engineering Academy of South Africa).

IBM in the USA were the first to donate several computers to SEASA in 1986 when the TryScience programme was initiated. IBM South Africa followed suite by upgrading the organisation's current equipment and thus assist the academy to uplift education for South Africa's youth.

SEASA is a voluntary, non-profit association, whose aim is to promote science, engineering and technology in South Africa. It was founded in June 1986 by concerned graduates from surrounding communities under the leadership of Dr Gordon Sibiya. A major project of SEASA is the Saturday Science Tuition Programme, which annually attracts some 300 grade 11 and 12 pupils. It is in this project that IBM's equipment will be utilized. Subjects that are offered at the academy to primarily disadvantaged scholars are: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Economics, Business Economics and Accountancy, all in the higher grade. The lessons are conducted at Wits University by a tutor-team of 11 qualified tutors, graduates, educators and professional persons. Since 1986 12 000 matrics have gone through the programme.

With the performance of SEASA's pupils excellence improving year by year, IBM feel proud to be associated with the success of South Africa's future.


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 Siyathuthuka Nursery School Project

The Siyathuthuka Nursery School Project assists with the set up and development of preschools in the Gauteng and Mpumalanga areas. It aims to provide environments conducive to productive learning by children in the preschool years. It also aims to train and support women to become educators to these very impressionable and young minds.

The organisation approached IBM with a request for a desktop, and IBM willingly obliged. Having a desktop would mean that the staff could access the internet, and find information they need and do research.


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 Vaalwater Laerskool

IBM SA's donation on Friday 03 October 2003 of a computer centre and software worth more than R200 000 to the tiny Vaalwater Laerskool in Limpopo Province will give severely disadvantaged students and those in remote farming districts the opportunity to bridge the digital divide.

The IBM donation includes ten computers, a server, educational software and a year's subscription to the Internet. An ISDN line has been installed at the school. Teachers have been familiarised with the facility.

A dual-medium (English/Afrikaans) school that has served the white farming community for the past 50 years, Vaalwater Laerskool has, in the past two years, been taking in black children for whom there is insufficient accommodation in the region's two township schools. The school has only 170 students, 45% of whom are from black communities too poor to pay school fees. It has therefore not been able to afford computer equipment.

IBM's global corporate social responsibility programme is focused on using technology to improve access to and standards of education, believing that education is the most important means of enabling communities to become sustainably self-sufficient.

In South Africa, IBM applies technology to achieve systematic school reform as well as adult education and workforce development. IBM works in partnership with schools and non-profit organisations in using technology to solve specific problems that impede student performance and effective adult learning.

The school's long-term plans for the computer centre include making it a community resource out of school hours.


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 Variety Club

IBM South Africa donated two desktop computers worth R 18 000 to one of six child rescue centers being opened by the Variety Club. This particular centre is based on Murrayfield, Pretoria.

The Variety Club has been described as the greatest children's charity in the world. Variety Club has identified the dire need for emergency services for children suffering the trauma of rape and abuse. With the proliferation of both Aids and child rape in South Africa, more and more innocent children are contracting Aids from their abusers. The organisation aims to establish six Variety Club Rescue Centres throughout South Africa. Each of these emergency facilities will cater for 12 raped and /or abused children at any one time. The children will remain at the centre until the courts establish a permanent home for them.

Alfred Mandewo represented IBM South Africa at a Variety Club banquet, hosted by Governor Tito Mboweni. The banquet was organised to raise funds for child rescue centers throughout South Africa. South Africa's business leaders heeded the call to donate generously and over R1.6 million was raised - sufficient funds to ensure that the first rescue centre in Pretoria becomes operational.

In total, IBM will donate IT equipment and solutions to the tune of about R 150 000.00. The equipment will be deployed in the six centres the organisation plans to open.


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 Westbury High School

On Wednesday 18 June 2003, IBM SA donated a computer laboratory to the value of R300 000 to the Westbury High School in Johannesburg. The IBM SA donation consisted of 20 workstations all connected to a server, a dot matrix printer and software. IBM SA will also sponsor the school's connection to the Internet for one year.

In keeping with IBM's corporate strategy when making donations, this computer laboratory will empower the Westbury community. This donation will bring new skills and therefore hope of employment to an area ridden by gangsterism and drug abuse. Students at the school now have the opportunity to become computer literate, offering a tangible, quick means of lifting themselves out of poverty. With exposure to technology, children may aim for careers they might otherwise not have thought of, as they develop capabilities that fit the modern workplace.

Following concerted efforts by the school principal and his staff in the past five years, the school's matric pass rate has increased from 50% to 78%. This was one of the reasons IBM chose to support Westbury High School: in spite of their limited resources, the teachers at this school are serious about changing the environment in Westbury.

The school has already raised funds to supplement the benefits of the computer laboratory through a bursary for students wishing to study computer science at tertiary level. It will also offer computer science as a school subject and a Unisa -accredited office management certificate - for which the first students will enrol in the July holidays.


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IBM Grants for 2004
Friersdale RC Intermediate School

 Friersdale RC Intermediate School

Friersdale RC public Intermediate School is in the Northern Cape on private Roman Catholic Church property. The school is a learning ground to some 393 learners, supported by the diligent efforts of 12 qualified educators.

Despite being situated in an area that is financially deprived, the school is proud of its sturdy buildings, two netball courts and soccer field. Running water and electricity are commodities that are highly valued.

The Ministry of Public Service and Administration, Minister Geraldine Fraser-Mioleketi, approached IBM SA Country Manager, Mark Harris, requesting assistance for computer equipment to Friersdale Intermediate School. The availability of computer equipment would ensure that the educators could become computer literate, and learn how to teach using computers. They in turn could then offer computer literacy classes to the learners.

In a joint venture with the Department of Public Service and Administration, IBM South Africa donated PCs, server, colour monitors and Dot Matrix printer to the value of over R200 000.



Present at the official opening of the IBM Computer Centre at Friersdale School was Minister of Public Service and Administration Geraldine Fraser-Moleketi MP (centre) and IBM SA Country General Manager(right). Looking on is the principal of the school Mr. F.J. de Klerke.



Educators from Friersdale School were overjoyed at receiving 18 new workstations. Second from left is Mr. Alfred Mandewo, IBM SA's Corporate Community Relations Manager.


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IBM Grants for 2005


 
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